Jane Eyre (2006) – Masterpiece Adaptation of Classic and Romantic Gothic Story

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Jane Eyre (2006) – Masterpiece Adaptation of Classic and Romantic Gothic Story

As a classic piece of literature, it's little wonder dozens of production companies undertake the task of adapting the work to screen. Throughout the years, I’ve collected and seen a number of them. Everything from the A&E telefilm (thumbs down) to the dated albeit interesting original BBC adaptation from the 80s starring Timothy Dalton (thumbs up). Whenever conversation with bookish friends would turn to the Jane Eyre adaptations we liked best, my usual spiel would also preclude the most recent miniseries from BBC. After copious amounts of gushing from said friends, I finally tracked a copy down.

The results are of that below, though first in order to introduce the cast, let’s take a quick recap down memory lane of the classic story.


No one has ever loved Jane Eyre (Ruth Wilson), at least no one in her short memory. As a child, she was left in the care of her aunt Reed (Tara Fitzgerald) who banished her to Lowood institution, a place that abuses students on a daily basis. Now, as a grown young woman, Jane advertises for a position as governess. Accepted by a Mrs. Fairfax (Lorraine Ashbourne), Jane travels to Thornfield Hall where she is to care for the ward of the estate’s owner, Mr. Edward Rochester (Toby Stephens).

During her employment at Thornfield, Jane’s life is changed in ways she never could have imagined. Her heart is awakened to the possibility of a happy life as she becomes equal with that of Mr. Rochester’s life. But secrets lurk in Thornfield Hall, and what once promised only happiness quickly shifts into a kind of prison.

There is a story to accompany my eventually seeing this. Following all of the flutter of recommendations I see this, I had checked it on Amazon only to discover it cost a whopping $80. Well, period drama aficionado I am, I told myself it couldn’t be that good. Fortunately, I did find a region 2 DVD that was in a more comfortable price range and on Valentine’s Day weekend, following another recommendation from my cousin, I came home that very day and began watching BBC’s miniseries.

It’s probably safe to say that each time this has been adapted – whether for television or as a feature film, each version has its own attributes and qualities. Though I’ve not read the Charlotte Bronte novel (what else is new, I know), I have my own reasons for what and why I like certain ones best. This 3-hour adaptation is giving the 2011 feature film (starring Michael Fassbender and Mia ) a challenge for the best of title.

FILM REVIEW |  Jane Eyre (2011) - Beautiful Cinematography, Script Reimagines the Classic Bronte Story
You think because I am poor, plain, obscure and little, that I have no heart? - Jane Eyre

Comparisons are inevitable with every string of adaptations, and this suffers the same fate. Sometimes this is a bad thing, others it’s actually an advantage. I think with this, it should be allowed to shine in a class of its own because it’s a mini series which means it’s able to take time in the telling of its tale. Were I to guess, I’d assume this meant the book is better represented. Anyone who isn’t a fan of Jane’s childhood years, this is the one series for you. I was astonished to experience how short and insignificant her days at the school or the Reed household are. Though it is more than this, it felt like you blinked and they were over. The dark harshness of her early years are glossed over because of this and nothing quite obtains the same misery or appalling abuse because of this.

Seeing a series that focus its time on Jane and Rochester is lovely (their banter is flirtatious and cute). True, this is a primary part of the story, but for some reason, the story comes across as new. Part of this can be attributed to the fact that Ruth plays Jane as a lighter version of the character. Her girlish tendencies give the character more personality and allow for the ordinarily emotionless woman (as depicted in the other versions) to express her feelings – whether they be of joy, disappointment, sorrow or fear, Ruth acts on what Jane feels inside. Gothic by nature, this also opens this entire adaptation up to being somehow more whimsical and without the same heaviness its peers wear with pride.

If this could be summed up in a matter of a few words, one would have to conclude this miniseries is the best Jane Eyre has to offer. There is a distinct Gothic sense, and a lighter approach to the material while still keeping its original concept intact. The costuming is gorgeous, and the chemistry between Ruth and Toby is ridiculously good. If you’re a fan of by Gothic stories or period drama, BBC’s Jane Eyre is not to be missed. It might not become your favorite, but it is worth seeing once if for no other reason than getting to see an actress who seems to understand the importance of showing Jane Eyre truly isn’t an unfeeling creature. 

Photos: BBC, Masterpiece Theatre / ITV

8 comments

  1. This is by far my favorite version. Although it glosses over Jane’s childhood and takes a few liberties with this the story, I feel it best captures the essence of who Jane is. Plus a flirty Tony Stephens makes Rochester much more appealing.

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    1. Right?? Toby is fantastic in this role. Judging him by a cinematic character of course (since I haven't read the book). I adore those flirty scenes - helps give the classic tale some new "life."

      Glad you too so enjoy this version, Brittaney. As always, I appreciate you dropping by to share your thoughts.

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  2. It's been so long since I read this, I feel like I need to go back and reread before I try to watch any movie version.

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    1. Nothing wrong with that, Dianna. I hope you do discover some of these and find one to enjoy. :)

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  3. I've read the book more than once. It's one of my favorite classics. I've never seen a film, and I haven't seen them all, that does Jane Eyre the book justice. But, I will check this one out. Thanks for sharing Rissi! Great review. :)

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    1. Nothing wrong with liking the book best. May I ask, is there an adaptation you think is closest - or how many have you seen? I've seen a good many of them (and own four or five of them). :D

      Thank YOU for reading and visiting!

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  4. Oh, Jane Eyre, one of my favourite books! And I love those mini series and old style adaptations of these works. My favourite being the 1995 BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice with Colin Firth. I have not yet seen this Jane Eyre adaptation so will now go look for it :) Thank you for sharing.

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    1. I'm so glad you enjoy this as a book, Olivia. I've not read it nor do I see myself reading it in the near future. That said, never say never. :)

      I watched the A&E adaptation with Colin Firth SO many times growing up. As a result it was one of my very favorite period dramas, and even to this day, I have a special place for it in my period drama loving heart. :)

      Thanks so much for visiting, Olivia - and I sure hope you can find this one. Let me know what you think if you do.

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